Six Nations: The Beleaguered Coaches Club

first_img Two coaches, one worry: Philippe Saint-Andre and Scott Johnson have copped a lot of criticism this Six NationsBy Alan DymockWhatever is said in haste before Saturday – whatever defensive line is thrown out or snarling reply comes back – it is only because both Scotland’s and France’s head coaches are under so much pressure.There are big differences between Philippe Saint-Andre’s side and Scott Johnson’s Scotland. One started the Six Nations well, winning a tight game against England without playing magnificently, but has deteriorated to the stage where they looked bewildered more than a little overawed against Wales. The other was spanked in their first two games but got the salving win their egos needed, away to Italy. However, a loss for either side heaps unbelievable pressure on the man in charge of the failures.He’s back: Brown returns for ScotlandWell, technically that is not true. It is the manner of loss that would be important for Johnson should they fall, while any loss would see albatrosses circling Saint-Andre’s head.See, while Johnson has been facing questions about why now is the time to re-select captain Kelly Brown and chuck out another totally different back-row combo, he has answered that he has assessed France’s strengths. “He (Brown) is a better fit for this team, this game,” Johnson informed the inquisitors. <> at Millenium Stadium on February 21, 2014 in Cardiff, Wales. Johnson has picked a team that he hopes will be able to slam into French mauls without wilting; guys he knows are fully fit and who are strong, or who Johnson perceives to be wise to French tricks. Brown and David Denton are strong, Johnnie Beattie is in form and plays in France. Richie Gray and Jim Hamilton are big boys who play in France. There’s not much he can do with his backs.The coach may well have flirted with bringing Ross Ford back in for his bulk, but he has learnt one thing, if only because it was getting screamed at him every game: the Scottish people demand a form player at hooker. Because for all the ridiculous talk of looking to win future tournaments and performing beyond means, all Scotland’s fans want right now is to compete with the big boys. Scaring France and losing will not be ideal, but it will be a vast improvement on being thoroughly embarrassed against Ireland and England and perhaps fewer will be calling for Johnson’s head if Scotland run close.Not coming back: Louis Picamoles has been droppedSaint-Andre, on the other hand, has to win. Despite the moments of confusion, the continued, bubbling resentment between clubs and country, the indiscipline, a dropped No 8 and a lack of leadership on the park, France will be expected to win this regardless of the venue. Losing to this Scotland team would signal an incredible low for France. Saint-Andre can call out his players as much as he wants, and in many games his playing staff have let him down. But when this happens often, eventually you have to ask why. “There is unbelievable talent within the French ranks, yet they cannot be organized for a game like this or motivated for it?” you may ask. Sometimes the coach has to carry the can.Whichever way you cut Scotland versus France, there is no outcome that suits both. One member of the Beleaguered Coaches Club will have a head-splitting migraine come Sunday morning, and it will have nothing to do with celebratory boozing. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Clermont Auvergne: Dismantling a dream

first_imgBlown away: Sitiveni Sivivatu is knocked onto his backside by Saracens’ Schalk Brits They can enjoy some glory, but it is the deep longing of a soon-to-be dismantled side that endears us to them. Clermont, darling, when will you realise that European potential?Keep your eyes on future editions of Rugby World Magazine to read our exclusive column on the future of European rugby. Follow this link to subscribe. In the May edition of Rugby World, Nathan Hines said: “The Heineken Cup final Clermont lost still hurts,” and “I want to do it this season more for the new guys and for Vern Cotter, who is leaving to coach Scotland, and for guys like Lee Byrne, who will leave the club at the end of the season.”Hines will not get his wish, and as Jacques Burger felled carrier after carrier and his mates slammed into every ruck, slowing and smashing up any attacking intent Clermont had in the Heineken semi at an eerily empty Twickenham, Sarries did not just look to be breaking up Clermont’s Cup hopes, they were dismantling a dream.Noisy, but disappointed: Les Jaunards, Clermont’s brilliant fans, are starved of European gloryCotter is off to Scotland. Hines is off to Sale Sharks, Byrne is off to Newport Gwent Dragons, Regan King is off back to Scarlets, Sitiveni Sivivatu is joining Castres, Gerhard Vosloo is joining Toulon. Now Jono Gibbes is coming in to take over the forwards duties at Clermont next year, Nick Abendanon and Zac Guildford are stepping into the backfield and Jonathan Davies comes into the centre, while Sébastien Vahaamahina will fill a lock berth.Big signings, yes, but also plenty of upheaval, and while you can replace star players when your pockets are deeper than les Jaunards sense of longing, you cannot ensure that these new faces will have as much impact as Sivivatu and Hines or that they can eradicate the terrible Heineken memories that definitely haunt the experienced players in the team.That home record remains in the high 70s, reinforcements are coming in next season and Clermont should make the Top 14 playoffs. Fine. But even if they win the title that they reneged on last year – the one that is all-important to the French and still a national obsession – it will always feel like a consolation to the neutrals across the continent. You cannot discount the romance. In his seminal book The Boys of Summer, American sports writer Roger Kahn spent time with baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers. A luminary Jackie Robinson was there, but Kahn was seeing years of near misses as the Dodgers missed out on pennants before finally emerging victorious in 1955. Of the time he said: “You may glory in a team triumphant, but you fall in love with a team in defeat.”For years this has been the neutral’s approach to Clermont Auvergne. Top 14 title aside, they have only flirted with European glory, playing scintillating rugby on the way, but when it has come to the only final neutrals care about – the Heineken Cup – they have failed.Being brutal we would say that they have consistently choked; if we were gentle we would say that they are the product of reckless abandon, a team not suited to knock-out nonsense.Except that they are.Reckless abandon: Brock James commits a sin in his own in-goal areaClermont are a multicultural, multifaceted side headed by a man, Vern Cotter, we are all told is pragmatic and driven. They have crushing forwards play and cunning backs. So why have Clermont consistently fallen behind the rest on the biggest European stage? In truth, it may hardly be worth answering the question until their squad is regenerated.That multinational team was put together with the explicit intent of steamrollering all. They have a budget that dwarfs the rest, even in France. They have an obscene record at their Stade Marcel-Michelin home, where they have not lost since November 2009. They have All Blacks and Lions, Bleus and hometown heroes. They should be unstoppable. They have had pundits and ex-pros declaring them the most dangerous and vividly willed team, hell bent on victory in the pool stages in Europe.It’s all come to nowt this year, in the face of a staunch and downright preposterous defensive effort by Saracens in the semi-final of the Heineken Cup. They also hurt themselves by refusing to change tactics, offloading and ploughing on with single runners into the heart of Sarries’ defence.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

The Heineken Cup team of the week

first_imgHe got pinged a few times – one occasion allowing Jimmy Gopperth to reduce Leinster’s deficit – but Toulon’s homegrown prop was directly responsible for ten points that changed the game. Clamping over a ruck to win a penalty that Matt Giteau landed just after half-time, he barged over three minutes later to give the hosts a 16-6 lead. It was a mountain for Leinster to climb from there.2. Schalk Brits (Saracens)Without Brits’ effervescent display, Saracens would have been comfortably overturned. The hooker made 91 metres, skating past defenders to defy the claustrophobic atmosphere in Belfast, and did his set-piece duties flawlessly. How he only has five Springbok caps remains a mystery.3. Logovi’i Mulipola (Leicester)Leicester’s attempt to derail European rugby’s most intimidating home record, spearheaded by their hairy tighthead, was exceptionally brave. Having made ten crunching tackles and run himself into the ground, Mulipola was exhausted as Alain Rolland blew to signal the end of Tigers’ challenge.4. Johann Muller (Ulster)Fighting the odds: Johann Muller of UlsterAt half-time, Muller told his troops that beating Saracens with 14 men would have been the biggest achievement of his career – that from a 2007 World Cup-winner with South Africa. As he always does, the lock poured his soul into the white shirt and inspired Ulster so close to an unthinkable victory.5. Paul O’Connell (Munster)This is the last version of the Heineken Cup as we know it, so it feels very fitting that a true icon of the tournament is sticking around. O’Connell’s leadership – especially in the absence of injured Peter O’Mahony – was superb. Six lineout takes (one on Toulouse’s throw) and the last of Munster’s six scores punctuated his fantastic day in Limerick.6. CJ Stander (Munster)Munster were already ahead 10-3 when O’Mahony left the pitch. That didn’t stop his replacement having a massive influence on the quarter-final with some imposing physicality – not least in the driving lineout maul. Eleven carries and ten tackles complemented a bulldozing try.7. Damien Chouly (Clermont)Clermont stretched their sensational home run to 75 consecutive victories on the back of an immensely muscular forward effort. Chouly was integral to that for the entire 80 minutes, although opposite number Julian Salvi worked extremely hard. Touted as the best last eight line-up ever, the four Heineken Cup quarter-finals did not disappoint. Here’s our team of the weekend. Captain Fantastic: Munster’s Paul O’Connell creeps over for a rare try against Toulouse 15. Rob Kearney (Leinster)When a full-back tops your tackle-count, you know your backs have been against the wall. Kearney senior was a shining light in Leinster’s defeat, epitomising their desperate scramble defence in the first half while also scaring the Heineken Cup champions with a couple of counters. He was one of the very few Dubliners to deliver on thoroughly underwhelming day.14. Simon Zebo (Munster)The organisation and power of Munster’s forwards was frighteningly effective.  However, their backline also demonstrated accuracy and desire for the less glamorous facets such as the kick-chase. While Keith Earls was a threat throughout, his wing colleague Zebo gets the nod for a wonderful pass ahead of the the hosts’ first try and a smart finish for the fifth.Mr Bombastic: Mathieu Bastareaud13. Mathieu Bastareaud (Toulon)Toulon’s mammoth midfielder was turned over once following a dopey decision to carry around the fringes. Even so, he produced close to his best against Irish opposition for the second time in a row. Bastareaud started like a train and careered through challenges all afternoon, most decisively in the build-up to Drew Mitchell’s score.12. Wesley Fofana (Clermont)Fofana still provided sparkle though Clermont ousted Leicester with a performance that was more mechanical than magical. His slick try split the sides after a typically gliding break had handed Tigers a stern warning. A simply wonderful player.11. Tommy Bowe (Ulster)Bowe beat a staggering nine defenders and it was a pleasure to see him on the big stage once again. His strong, tackle-busting carries were the catalyst for a raucous Ravenhill to believe their brave side could pull off something special.On the up: Owen Williams v Damien Chouly10. Owen Williams (Leicester)Warren Gatland must bring this man to South Africa. Amid a hugely hostile atmosphere, he delivered once more to confirm his temperament will thrive in the Test arena. Nailed four from the tee – including two from halfway that had another 15 metres in them – and set up Leicester’s solitary try with a perfect cross-kick. Ian Keatley deserves a big mention for leading Munster’s attack at Thomond Park.9. Conor Murray (Munster)Exceptionally dangerous behind Munster’s bludgeoning pack, Murray directed his team’s dismantling of Toulouse with aplomb. Two snipes directly foreshadowed tries, while crisp distribution allowed the runners in red to pose serious problems.1. Xavier Chiocci (Toulon) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight 8. Steffon Armitage (Toulon)Billy Vunipola – wearing six yet playing at eight – put in an outstanding shift for Saracens. Armitage utterly terrorised Leinster, though. He probably won’t ever play for England again, but the 28 year-old was brilliant, barreling around to devastating effect and causing havoc at every turn.last_img read more

George Ford picks five of the best 10s in the game

first_imgRecovering from injury that saw him miss the England tour of New Zealand, Bath fly-half George Ford assesses the best No 10s he’s played with or against Hot-stepper: George Ford had a breakthrough season with Bath that led to England recognition LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight “I’ve played against Charlie a few times and obviously watched him growing up.  He has a superb range and variety of kicks. I like the way he sees the space on the field and executes his kicks. He’s instinctive and doesn’t give it too much thought. Like a golfer round the greens, he has a real touch with the boot. I like the way Charlie spirals the ball from hand, which gives him accuracy and distance.”Downtime: George Ford is getting ready for a huge season with Bath and potentially EnglandBest defensive 10: Owen Farrell“Obviously I’ve played with Owen for ages and it’s not just his big hits and the way he puts himself about that you respect, but the way he drives the team and lifts others around him. He’s the defensive energy of the team. He thrives on that part of the game. Luckily I’ve avoided getting smashed by him, but I’ve seen him knock plenty of people backwards. It helps that he’s a big lad, it’s his genetics with his dad but he wants to carry on the family tradition!”Best running 10: Nick Evans“I know Quade Cooper is a talented runner, but I’ll go for Nick Evans because I’ve played against him. He’s a Kiwi so he’s been brought up to play what he sees and take defensive lines on. He has excellent timing, and has a knack of taking the line on at the right time. If he makes a break it’s because he’s seen something. He’ll take on a tight five player who is puffing from a scrum, expose them and attack them. He’s pretty quick but uses the ball well to put team-mates into space. He’s a very clever player.” A former IRB Junior Player of the Year, Bath lynchpin and second top points scorer in the Aviva Premiership Rugby this year, George Ford also made his England debut in the Six Nations before missing the New Zealand tour to have a shoulder operation.Here he tells RW about five of the most talented fly-halves he’s faced…Best place-kicking 10: Jonny Wilkinson“I’d have to say Jonny (Wilkinson), not only for his longevity, but for his consistency. Everyone talks about the hard work he puts in – and I’ve been lucky enough to have a few sessions with him – but what I like is as games get bigger, say the Heineken Cup Final, or Top 14 final, his place kicking gets even better. He doesn’t wilt under pressure. He could also punished teams with drop goal from his left or right boot. His advice was to practice with an outcome at the end and concentrate on my technique so when the crowd are on your back and the tension is building, you shut the close down, focus and get the job done.”Perform under pressure: Jonny Wilkinson thrived the bigger the gameBest 10 for game management: Jonny Sexton“The way he controls things on the field, you can tell Jonny’s put his homework in the week before the game. The way he manages when to kick, run or pass is the best I’ve seen. When you play against him, he’s very vocal in organizing those around him. Since he broke through at Leinster and progressed to play in the biggest games for Leinster, Ireland and the Lions, you can see him growing in responsibility. He’s always been a 10 who demands total committment from him team-mates.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6ci3yl4330Best 10 for kicking out of hand: Charlie Hodgson https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5Kj4F2DmyIGeorge Ford wears the adidas Predator Incurza rugby boots, available from July 1st at www.adidasrugby.com. Join the conversation @adidasuk and @adidasrugbylast_img read more

Aviva Premiership analysis: Nick Easter inspires Harlequins

first_img Main man: Nick Easter was exceptional as Harlequins hit their straps against Leicester Tigers LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS On Saturday, Harlequins looked like the exciting, eye-catching side that tasted Premiership glory in 2012. We analyse what went so right for Conor O’Shea’s men. TAGS: HarlequinsHighlight Indeed it appears so. And Harlequins are climbing the table staying true to their own style, which is all the more refreshing and respectable.Thanks to BT Sport and Premiership Rugby for the match footage. For tickets to the Premiership Rugby Final click here. Rather than a conventional midfield switch, receiver Matt Hopper plays another pass to Brown. As Austin Healy pointed out on BT Sport’s live programme, the point is to lure the fringe defence out of position:Only an intelligent, proactive piece of play from Parling (orange circle), who moves from the guard position on the other side of the ruck to stop Brown, prevents a clean break.Soon afterwards, Leicester were not so lucky:From almost precisely the same structure, Hopper feeds Joe Gray, who sends Easter carrying into the body-guard position. Tom Youngs intercepts him, but strength in contact buys Care enough time to dart onto his shoulder.This screenshot shows how Parling and Ayerza are just too slow to react:O’Shea labelled Easter’s deft offload “out of this world” in his post-match interview. It is worth another look, for sure:Having wrestled the ascendancy, Harlequins – and their Easter-Care axis – did no relent. Here, their No 8 trundles into the Tigers 22 with a powerful carry. Pearce awards a penalty as Salvi infringes.Where it would be so easy to take three points at only 10-9 up though, Care senses weakness and maintains the tempo, linking up with Marland Yarde:Two phases later, Jack Clifford gave more notice of his massive potential by bursting over:Care’s running threat keeps the fringe defence honest and Clifford, pacey enough to have represented England at sevens, exploits the opportunity nicely:Not long after half-time, Yarde got in on the act with a timely try that would have boosted his Six Nations prospects:Easter’s pass into midfield here shows unfussy awareness, essentially handing space to a dangerous strike runner. Then, two pieces of clever semi-obstruction – let’s call it distraction – from Sinckler on the left and Tom Williams on the right help fashion a gaping hole:Sheer speed sends Yarde clear.From here, Harlequins needed to defend for a decent period, but they broke loose at the death to clinch a bonus point:Featuring runners hunting shoulders from depth, this score is Harlequins all over. Brown’s acrobatic assist out of the back of his hand may have won headlines, but Joe Trayfoot‘s effort – delaying until Anthony Allen has overrun his interception attempt – is arguably even more skilful and instrumental in manufacturing the opening.This tighter angle is insightful:O’Shea ‘s last words for the media were simple: “We’re coming.” Last week, one broadsheet billed Harlequins’ clash against London Welsh as a ‘basement battle’. Although undeniably clichéd, the epithet was accurate enough – Conor O’Shea’s team were languishing in ninth place before travelling to Oxford.Over 11 games, their fast-paced approach had not quite clicked. Indeed, for large parts of their 24-13 victory over Welsh a week ago, things remained rather disjointed. However, Saturday’s date with Leicester Tigers finally brought fluidity.On a harum-scarum afternoon at The Stoop, the 2012 champions made a mockery of their position on the league ladder. Fittingly, the man who spurred the result was someone who has been wholly unaffected by his team’s inconsistency. Nick Easter put in yet another gargantuan performance.To borrow a point made recently by Jamie Carragher in reference to his former Liverpool teammate Steven Gerrard, we would be going totally crazy about the Harlequins No 8 if he were a recent academy graduate displaying similar form. As it is, in light of Ben Morgan’s dreadfully unlucky ankle injury, there are plenty of calls coming for Easter to make an imminent England return and add to his 47 caps.Whether or not the 36 year-old does receive a phone call from Stuart Lancaster, he will be huge part of his club’s surge during the second half of the season. Certainly, Harlequins were back close to their entertaining, all-action best during a 32-12 defeat of Tigers. Here is how they found themselves.Defence: desperation and breakdown decisionsLeicester seemed understandably confident coming off a rousing triumph over Bath and, with so many quality players amid their ranks, they were always likely to cause problems at certain times. In high-stakes matches between good outfits, momentum shifts are a given – your response to spells on the back foot is  what defines you.Graham Kitchener made one fine line-break and Owen Williams fired Leicester into a 9-3 advantage. That said, Harlequins never stopped working or lost a tangible togetherness. Watch this reaction to a Mat Tait run:George Lowe is brushed off initially, but Chris Robshaw – on his first game back after injury – brings down the Tigers full-back. Tait then manages to link up with Geoff Parling and Lowe scrambles back to make another tackle. Ben Youngs is then engulfed.Even though Harlequins are far behind the gain-line, they show work-rate and discipline to retain their structure on the next phase:Fly-half Owen Williams is pressurised and a cross-kick comes to nothing.Captain Joe Marler sets the line-speed here, and he was quietly outstanding all day. This copybook hit on Tom Youngs – among the most effective carriers in this country – stopped the visitors dead:Leicester in general, and their superb openside flanker Julian Salvi in particular, derailed Bath by throwing bodies at the breakdown and disrupting ruck ball. Springbok Francois Louw, so influential this weekend against Wasps, could not get a look in.It was a totally different story this time around. Robshaw reproduced the pilfering that ousted Australia and made himself a total nuisance. His first sniff came when Ben Youngs took a quick tap and raced away:Although Tait does just enough to haul the ball back on this occasion, it isn’t long before England’s skipper forces a penalty out of referee Luke Pearce when Parling is felled by Kyle Sinckler‘s chop-tackle:Leicester enjoyed 55 per cent of possession in the second period, meaning Harlequins needed to soak up some steady pressure. They did so very well. This lineout maul five metres out was halted when Charlie Matthews man-handled his way through bodies and onto Leonardo Ghiraldini.The Italian hooker peels away, but Robshaw dives in and clamps on as he loses his footing:Minutes later, Marler was the beneficiary as Parling found himself isolated. With 67 minutes on the clock, this evidenced the loosehead’s impressive engine and appetite. He is not about to hand over England’s number one shirt:With regard to the Harlequins defence, it is best to finish on one instance from the first half which tied together desire and decision-making. Watch what happens as Williams darts clear and links up with Kitchener:A direct tussle with England incumbent Ben Youngs teased out a wonderful Danny Care display, and this cover tackle on Kitchener is a brilliant intervention. Ugo Monye and Mike Brown then keep their cool, retreating around the back foot to counter-ruck and force the ball loose.Brown regathers and, seeing space in front of him, elects not to kick. The choice is rewarded when Care hits a sycthing support line. It was a neat encapsulation of Harlequins’ attacking effort.Attack: angles, offloads and ambitionExpansiveness and impeccable core skills form the bedrock of O’Shea’s philosophy. Even early on, the hosts set their stall out to fulfill those ideals. Using the full width of the field, this exchange between Care, Easter, Robshaw and Brown – which only ends due to a contentious ruck penalty as Brown enters the wrong side – is characteristic of Harlequins’ attacking intent:Later comes this neat move directed by lively fly-half Ben Botica:last_img read more

Finn Russell banned for three weeks

first_imgGiven Russell’s acceptance of his actions, his previous disciplinary record and his remorse, the maximum 50% mitigation was applied so he is banned for three weeks.He will miss Racing 92’s Champions Cup round of 16 tie against Edinburgh on Sunday and, depending on that result, either their quarter-final and their next Top 14 match or their next two Top 14 matches. So the suspension will run until either 18 April 2021 or 25 April 2021.Russell was the fifth player sent off in this year’s Six Nations, with Ireland’s Peter O’Mahony and Bundee Aki, Scotland’s Zander Fagerson and France’s Paul Willemse also red-carded during the championship. The five red cards were as many as in the last 14 Six Nations combined. Finn Russell banned for three weeksFinn Russell has been banned for three weeks following his red card in Scotland’s Six Nations victory over France on Friday night.The Scotland fly-half was sent off in the 71st minute after leading with the forearm into a tackle and making contact with France full-back Brice Dulin’s neck.He appeared before an independent disciplinary committee for infringing Law 9.12 (A player must not physically or verbally abuse anyone. Physical abuse includes, but is not limited to, biting, punching, contact with the eye or eye area, striking with any part of the arm (including stiff-arm tackles), shoulder, head or knee(s), stamping, trampling, tripping or kicking).Russell accepted that he had committed an act of foul play and that a red card was warranted, but he suggested that it was an infringement of Law 9.24 (A ball-carrier is permitted to hand off an opponent provided excessive force is not used) rather than a strike on Dulin.However, the disciplinary committee felt the original categorisation (Law 9.12) was correct and determined the incident as mid-range, which has an entry point of six weeks. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition for magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.center_img The Scotland fly-half was sent off against France Scotland’s Finn Russell was red-carded against France (SNS Group/Getty Images) last_img read more

Comité Nominador Conjunto Busca la Participación Mientras se Inicia el…

first_imgComité Nominador Conjunto Busca la Participación Mientras se Inicia el Trabajo Posted Mar 11, 2013 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Oficina de Asuntos Públicos] El Comité Nominador Conjunto para la Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia  (por sus siglas en inglés, JNCPB) está solicitando comentarios sobre preguntas específicas antes de su próxima reunión.JNCPB realizará su segunda reunión en el centro de conferencias Barbara C. Harris Camp en Greenfield, NH, del 18 al 20 de marzo. La agenda incluye desarrollar una cronología y metodología para solicitar la visión y participación sobre cómo será la iglesia en el futuro y sobre las cualidades que la próxima Obispa Presidente debe poseer para obtener ese puesto.Los invitados incluyen la Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori  quien reflexionará sobre la situación de la iglesia y la vocación del Obispo Presidente; el Obispo Clay Matthews, representante de Desarrollo Pastoral, que debatirá los mejores métodos en la búsqueda de obispos.JNCPB invita a reflexionar especialmente antes de su reunión el 18 de marzo, sobre cualquiera de las siguientes preguntas:Ya sea la búsqueda de un rector o de un obispo, ¿cuál fue lo mejor que hiso para ese proceso?Ya sea la búsqueda de un rector o de un obispo, ¿cuáles fueron sus herramientas de comunicación? ¿con los candidatos o con los constituyentes?¿Qué recomendaría que evitemos?¿Hay alguna otra cosa que le gustaría compartir con el comité sobre su proceso de búsqueda?Además, los miembros de la JNCPB solicitan oraciones para esta próxima fase de su proceso.Para hacer comentarios: [email protected] miembros están listados aquí.En Twitter: PB27Nominaciones o #JNCPBEn Facebook: www.facebook.com/pb27nominations Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

De regreso a la escuela: bendición de mochilas y vidas

first_img Submit a Job Listing Por Pat McCaughan Posted Aug 26, 2013 Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY El “Día de la Esperanza” de la iglesia episcopal del Redentor proporciona materiales escolares y cortes de pelo, mientras los niños de Sarasota, Florida, se preparan para regresar a la escuela. Foto de la Diócesis Episcopal de Florida Sudoccidental.[Episcopal News Service] Niños de todas las edades están disfrutando de un rito de iniciación estacional —la bendición de las mochilas— y obteniendo incluso un poco de ayuda de sus iglesias episcopales para regresar a la escuela.Para Jalen Henderson, de 12 años y miembro de la iglesia episcopal de San Marcos [St. Mark’s Episcopal Church] cerca del centro de San Diego, asistir a la segunda fiesta anual de “Regreso a la escuela” el 17 de agosto significó recibir papel, lápices, una calculadora y otros materiales escolares nuevos, así como medias, zapatos, un corte de pelo, una foto, un almuerzo y algunos juegos.“Gracias por darme mi mochila y otros materiales”, escribió Henderson con auténtica gratitud durante una de sus últimas escalas del día —una mesa de manualidades y actividades en el salón parroquial. “Creo que el sexto grado será fantástico”.Mu Aye, una refugiada kariana que vive en San Diego, también puso por escrito su gratitud: “En verdad me encanta mi mochila y conseguí todo lo que necesitaba. Sin ustedes, habríamos tenido que gastar muchísimo dinero de nuestros bolsillos. Veo a todo el mundo feliz, entre ellos yo”, según dijo la estudiante de una universidad comunitaria.En la iglesia de Todos los Santos [All Saints Church] en River Ridge, Luisiana, Robin Peters, de 55 años, reconoció ser una de los niñas “más grandes” y de recibir múltiples bendiciones mientras  el Rdo. Jay Angerer oraba el 18 de agosto por los alumnos, los maestros, los padres, el año escolar y las mochilas.“Necesitaba algunas bendiciones”, dijo Peters, una maestra de kindergarten que también toma cursos de pedagogía en la Universidad de Tulane y quien tiene una hija adulta en la universidad.Las bendiciones, junto con los obsequios de ropa interior en el llamado “Domingo de Bragas” [Undie Sunday] y  un convite de helados, se combinaron para hacer la ocasión “sagrada y dulce y divertida” para que Peters llevara su mochila negra y verde limón con óvalos lumínicos hasta la baranda del altar junto con unas otras ocho personas.“Todo el mundo necesita la bendición de Dios cuando se dispone a regresar a la escuela”, dijo ella durante una entrevista telefónica el 22 de agosto desde su casa en la parroquia de Jefferson. “Es un momento de cambio”, según la pequeña Claudia Berault, alumna de 6 años del kindergarten de la escuela subvencionada del Lycée Français. Para su mamá, Eleanor, si bien es una ocasión amable “siempre tiene algo de agridulce”, un reconocimiento de que “crecen tan aprisa”.“La tradición de la bendición de las mochilas la empezamos en los últimos años y ha sido en verdad muy bonita”, dijo Berault durante una entrevista telefónica el 23 de agosto. “Simboliza que estamos allí para apoyarlos a todos ellos, aunque no seamos su familia directa. Es igual al “así lo haré” que respondemos comunitariamente durante los bautizos: significa que estamos allí, que somos parte de tu gente. Es algo bonito”.Muchas congregaciones a través del país, desde la iglesia de la Trinidad [Trinity Church] en Fort Wayne, Indiana, hasta la iglesia de Cristo [Christ Church] en San Antonio, Texas, acostumbran a bendecir las mochilas cuando termina el verano y los estudiantes regresan a la escuela. Muchas congregaciones han formado también asociaciones comunitarias y combinan el ritual con iniciativas sociales en   las que ofrecen ropa, artículos de higiene personal, exámenes de salud, comidas, juegos y otras actividades.En Sarasota, Florida, el “Día de la Esperanza” de la iglesia episcopal del Redentor  [Episcopal Church of the Redeemer] se disfruta como una Navidad en agosto, según dijo Donna Derosier.El club del equipo de voluntarios reunido para el “Día de la Esperanza” de la iglesia episcopal del Redentor al objeto de distribuir artículos de primera necesidad mientras los niños de Sarasota, Florida, se preparan para regresar a la escuela. Foto de la Diócesis Episcopal de Florida Sudoccidental.Para Derosier, de 55 años, madre soltera que esta criando a Fuller, su hijo de 15 años, y a Breanna, su nieta de 11, la jornada es como la respuesta a una oración.“Ha sido duro”, dijo ella durante una entrevista telefónica reciente. “Trabajé para el estado durante 25 años. Tuve un accidente automovilístico y me hospitalizaron durante tres meses y no me mantuvieron el empleo, después de 25 años. Una vez que pierdes tu empleo, todo se complica rápidamente”.Batallando por sobrevivir, su casa sujeta a una ejecución hipotecaria, se sintió “encantada” de recibir una llamada de Laura Crouse, feligresa del Redentor y organizadora del evento del 3 de agosto, para invitarla a participar.“Le pregunté cómo había conseguido mi nombre: lo obtuvo del programa de mochilas en una escuela donde a los niños les permiten que traigan meriendas y comida a la casa durante el fin de semana”, recordaba Derosier.A partir de ahí todo empezó a ir mejor.Ella y su familia participaron de un abundante desayuno de salchichas y huevos, preparado por un feligrés del Redentor y por Jeff Trefry, un chef profesional que dijo estar “feliz de poder colaborar con mis dones”. Luego, él sirvió un almuerzo de carne de falda en salsa con puré de papas, así como una variedad de bocadillos a lo largo del día.Durante el día, los Derosier fueron pasando a través de todos los puestos: exámenes médicos, dentales y oftalmológicos; tratamiento de fluoruro dental; un improvisado salón de belleza y barbería y un estudio fotográfico. Recibieron materiales escolares, artículos de higiene personal, tarjetas de regalo para ropa y zapatos, biblias y juegos, e incluso la oportunidad de jugar a los bomberos —con cascos, chalecos y equipos de los bomberos locales, que se ofrecieron a contribuir a las actividades de la jornada.Crouse dijo que en el evento se atendieron a unos 150 niños, “tantos como nuestro campus puede  acomodar”, gracias a una recaudación de fondos y a donaciones personales que ascendieron a $16.500.Olivia White, de 16 años y sobrina de Crouse, sirvió de embajadora para una familia de cinco “de manera que ellos nunca se sintieron solos”, durante todo el día.De los menores que ella tuvo a su cargo, niñas de 15 y 13 años y varones de cinco y seis, no todos se mostraron entusiastas con los chequeos de salud, pero se embullaron cuando les hicieron sus nuevos peinados y cortes de pelo, explicó White.“Es ahí donde interviene la magia” afirmó ella. “[Los estilistas voluntarios] te hacen sentir como una celebridad y eso es una gran cosa. Cuando te ves bien, te sientes bien. Una chica de 15 años que estaba por empezar en la escuela superior se sentía feliz de haber logrado eso”.Las fotos también resultan una gran atracción. “Las fotos son estupendas. Toman una foto individual de cada uno y luego también una foto en familia. Es realmente genial”.Según avanzaba el día, las amistades crecían, añadió White. “Comemos juntos. Terminamos jugando juntos. Afuera hay lanzamiento de aros, pintura de uñas, helados y palomitas de maíz. La jornada es increíble. Terminan con el almuerzo; los despedimos con el estómago lleno. Todo el proceso toma unas cinco horas, pero pasan rapidísimo”.De la misma manera, la iglesia de San Mateo [St. Matthew’s Church] en Ontario, Oregón, se asocia con el Departamento de Servicios Humanitarios del estado, las escuelas y otras organizaciones, ya que juntos “podemos hacer más de lo que podemos hacer por separado”.San Mateo lleva a cabo recaudaciones de fondos y sirve como centro de distribución de las mochilas, en conjunto con otras organizaciones, según dice Prudence Sherman, feligresa que organizó el evento del 12 de agosto.El promedio de asistencia dominical a la iglesia es de 45 personas, pero este año atendió a unos 600 niños en total, y los suministros que sobraron se distribuyeron en la localidad, dijo ella. “Podemos ser pocos en número, pero no nos arredra el tamaño”, agregó Sherman, una ex maestra. “Vimos que había una necesidad y nos comprometimos. Tenemos muchísimo que hacer y estamos comprometidos a hacerlo.Janie Padgett, coordinadora de desarrollo del Departamento de Servicios Humanitarios de Oregón, dijo que la zona es una comunidad agrícola que enfrenta dificultades económicas pero que “pese a las desventajas, encontramos formas de servir a los niños. Es un buen ejemplo de cómo, cuando la Iglesia y el gobierno y la comunidad empresarial se asocian, podemos ser muchísimo más capaces de responder a las necesidades de nuestras comunidades”.Heather Smith de la iglesia de San Marcos dijo que al menos 15 congregaciones en la Diócesis de San Diego han apoyado la Fiesta de Regreso a la Escuela, en su segundo año.Cada vez más miembros y organizaciones de la comunidad están participando, y ella espera que el número siga creciendo, de manera que más niños reciban ayuda. Se atendieron a unos 200 niños que se inscribieron con antelación a través de la tutoría extraescolar, del almacenaje y distribución de alimentos y de otros programas, amén de otros 25 que acudieron sin inscribirse previamente, explicó.“Nuestra idea es que todos los niños deben sentirse entusiasmados y tener lo que necesitan para regresar a la escuela, y ésa no es la realidad para muchos niños”, dijo Smith, de 34 años. “La idea era que podíamos hacer pequeños cambios que significaran mucho para ellos. Ya ellos enfrentan bastante dificultades y esto puede tener un impacto duradero”.Para Derosier, en Sarasota, asistir al “Día de la Esperanza” de la iglesia del Redentor fue todo eso, y más.“Poco sabía yo, cuando llegué allí, que sería tan extenso y tan bien organizado”, comento. “Fue increíble”.¿Y las cosas estupendas que nos llevamos?“Ahora bien, nos hicieron unas fotos bellísimas, una foto realmente magnífica de mi nieta. Yo no he podido comprar ninguna foto de la escuela. Sencillamente no he tenido el dinero”.Y afuera, a punto de marcharse, agregó: “Hubo una donación de plantas. Ahora tengo una planta de tomate que crece en mi patio, y tiene un tomate. En verdad fue lindo pasar el día de este modo con mi hijo y con mi nieta”.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y está radicada en Los Ángeles. Traducción de Vicente Echerri Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI De regreso a la escuela: bendición de mochilas y vidas Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Video: One young adult…and a South African clinic

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Africa, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal News Service] Keri Geiger from the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia has decided to do something bold and daring. She’s left behind her steady job on a labor ward in Richmond to bring her nursing skills to a poverty-stricken community in South Africa.Geiger is spending one year as a Young Adult Service Corps volunteer, working with the Overstrand Care Centre in Hawston. Her placement is a partnership between the Episcopal Church and HOPE Africa, the Anglican Church of Southern Africa‘s social development arm.Additional videos in this ENS series highlighting the ministry of YASC missionaries follow.One young adult…and a provincial archivesOne young adult…and a mission for migrant workersOne young adult…and a mission to seafarers March 13, 2014 at 7:31 pm That she is compassionate and caring I have no doubt but South Africa is the richest country with the best super structure, a pretty prevalent western culture and excellent medical schools of its own, in Africa. It would be much more impressive as healing evangelism either in the Southern part of our own country or Zambia. Submit an Event Listing March 13, 2014 at 4:17 pm Thank you for sharing Keri’s compassionate ministry; and her spreading of God’s love with healing care. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 13, 2014 Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Laura Inscoe says: Grace van Thillo says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Video: One young adult…and a South African clinic Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID March 13, 2014 at 11:10 pm Keri has a deep call to seek and serve Christ in others, and we’re so proud of her and grateful. St. John’s, Richmond, VA prays with and for Keri every week. Join us! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Margo Fletcher says: Youth & Young Adults Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Video, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missionaries, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (3) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Young Adult Service Corps, last_img read more

Atlanta bishop rallies opposition to death penalty with book of…

first_img Comments (6) By David PaulsenPosted Feb 12, 2018 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 13, 2018 at 3:20 pm IMHO those who call themselves “Right-to-Lifers” yet do not oppose both the death penalty AND war are among the biggest hypocrites alive. Tim & time again research has demonstrated the death penalty does not act as a durance to violent behavior. Those who exclude killing during war since it is also state sanctioned seem to have never seen the horror of war and all the mangled bodies or are psychologically warped and derive pleasure from the horror of war. I’ve seen the horror of war and like General Eisenhower said “I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, as only one who has seen its brutality, its futility, its stupidity.” Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. February 12, 2018 at 1:10 pm How funny that they do not make the same arguments when it is about abortion! Its wrong to kill a convicted killer but perfectly okay to put the unborn to death! Astounding logic! Rector Shreveport, LA Edward Mills says: PJ Cabbiness says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Miguel Rosada says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Dr. Stan Lightner says: Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC February 12, 2018 at 6:54 pm I agree with Miguel’s comment on abortion, the killing an innocent child and the hypocrisy of opposing the execution of a convicted murderer. The travesty is the amount of time it takes to carry out the sentence. The years of appeal after appeal must be torture for the victims family forcing them to relive their loss year after year. Where is the compassion for them. The perpetrator needs to stand before God to answer for their crime. A quick execution will hasten that meeting and bring closure to the victims family. Bill Louis says: Featured Jobs & Calls February 12, 2018 at 4:23 pm Though I am against the death penalty, primarily because so many folks on death row have later been exonerated, I must agree with Miguel above. Also, the one poster is a bad translation of the command from the Decalogue. It should be translated “You shall not commit murder”. The Hebrew is unambiguous. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN February 12, 2018 at 9:04 pm I don’t believe in “a total ban on abortion” as referenced above, or reversing Roe. I am exactly where the Episcopal Church is. Abortion should remain legal, it is always the taking of a life, and it should not be used as birth control — which I would argue it is being done widely. But I do believe that we are witnesses to a silent holocaust in the abortion industry in this country. There are cases where it is the lesser of two or more evils, but these cases are fairly rare. But I digress. My main point was my opposition to the death penalty due to the number of false convictions, overturned later, of death row inmates — and the improper translation of the Decalogue as “You should not kill”, The Hebrew should be translated “murder” — which has a vastly different meaning. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Edward Mills says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Death Penalty Atlanta bishop rallies opposition to death penalty with book of articles by faith, legal leaders Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Robert Wright, center, joins an anti-death penalty demonstration in 2014 outside the prison in Jackson, Georgia, where state executions are carried out. Photo: Diocese of Atlanta.[Episcopal News Service] The death penalty was reinstated by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1976. Since then, 1,468 convicts have been executed across the country.And, according to records kept by the Death Penalty Information Center, more than 80 percent of those executions have been carried out in the South, which Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Robert Wright sees as a “terrible irony” for a region known as the Bible Belt.“People want the love of Jesus for themselves, in terms of redemption, but they want the Old Testament ‘eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth’ for the people who do these terrible murders,” Wright told Episcopal News Service. “Do we serve a God who can have compassion for the victim and the perpetrator?”For Wright, the answer is an unequivocal “yes,” and he is heartened by the Episcopal Church’s decades of speaking out against the death penalty while also providing pastoral care to victims’ families.The Supreme Court’s 1976 decision outlined how states can craft constitutional death penalty laws. Thirty-one states have such laws, and eight of those states carried out executions in 2017, including one in Wright’s state of Georgia. In an effort to renew public attention to the issue and encourage greater advocacy toward abolishing the death penalty, Wright has collected five articles by faith and legal leaders in a book to be released Feb. 15 by the Diocese of Atlanta.“A Case for Life: Justice, Mercy, and the Death Penalty” includes the story of Wright’s growing advocacy since 2012, when he became bishop of a diocese that includes the prison in Jackson, Georgia, where death row inmates are held and executed. He last visited the inmates Feb. 7 as he does every few months, praying with them and sharing the Eucharist.He also has joined vigils outside the prison when executions have been carried out.“Serving as a pastor demands that I resist the temptation to engage in denial and euphemism because issues are hard or that people have differing opinions about a matter,” Wright writes. “That said, we can believe anything we choose to believe about capital punishment, but you can’t make Jesus a proponent.”Bishop Andrew Doyle of the Diocese of Texas wrote an article for the book, about the murder of an Episcopal priest in his diocese by the priest’s son. Texas has executed 548 people since 1976, five times more than any other state. But the priest’s son was not among them, receiving instead a life sentence with the support of members of the local faith community.“They chose to bear out a different witness over and against the prevailing world’s values of violence and retributive justice,” Doyle writes.The other authors are a retired Georgia Supreme Court justice, a human rights lawyer who has argued and won three death penalty cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, and Susan Casey, an Episcopalian and attorney who represented a Georgia woman put to death in 2015.“I’m against capital punishment because of my faith,” Casey, a member of St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in Atlanta, said in an interview with Episcopal News Service. “I don’t believe that any person is beyond redemption. For me, that’s the essence of my faith and my belief.”Her client, Kelly Gissendaner, was convicted in the murder of her husband. She was having an affair with another man, who received a life sentence for carrying out the murder, but she received the death penalty. Casey said Gissendaner’s faith grew while on death row, and she studied theology while behind bars.“She came to understand that God’s mercy and forgiveness still were available to her, despite what she had done. Over time, Kelly gained confidence in the strength and magnitude of God’s grace and redemptive power,” Casey says in her article in “A Case for Life.”Casey represented Gissendaner for 14 years, until her execution on Sept. 30, 2015. Since then, much of Casey’s work as an attorney has focused on what is called restorative justice, which seeks to support the victims of crimes and their families while helping convicts find their way to redemption.Gissendaner’s children were ages 12, 7 and 5 at the time of their father’s murder. In adulthood, they shunned their mother, but over time Gissendaner was able to reconcile with each of them, to the point that they became advocates for her in trying to stop her execution.Casey alludes to that process in describing her emotions at witnessing Gissendaner’s final moments alive.“The children who had chosen love and forgiveness over hatred and anger were made to swallow the bitter, collective pill of vengeance,” Casey writes. “It was tempting to despair about a society that leaves no room for the power of redemption and justice that is restorative, but I tried to resist.”Strapped to the execution gurney, Gissendaner sang the hymn “Amazing Grace” as the state took her life.The Episcopal Church has stood against the death penalty since 1958, and General Convention has regularly affirmed that opposition since capital punishment was reinstated in 1976. A 2015 resolution titled simply “Abolish the Death Penalty” encourages bishops in states where the death penalty is legal to “develop a witness to eliminate the death penalty.”The number of executions each year has gradually declined nationwide since 1999, when 98 people were executed. That number fell to 20 in 2016, but it rose to 23 last year, when the national spotlight focused on Arkansas’ rush to execute eight men on death row before its lethal injection drugs expired.Episcopalians were among those rallying against those executions in Arkansas, including at prayer vigils at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Little Rock. In the end, four of the executions were carried out. The other four were stayed.The death penalty remains in effect in Arkansas, and 32 people were on the state’s death row last year, among 2,817 nationwide, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.“There is no political will to do anything about this,” Wright said, and yet he sees clear biblical and visceral imperatives for Christians.“We worship a guy every Sunday who was executed by the state in collusion with different religious people, and here that plays out again,” Wright said.In Matthew 25, Jesus exalts the act of visiting the prisoner alongside feeding the hungry and caring for the sick. And what do inmates look like when they’re strapped to the execution gurney with their arms out? “Like Jesus on the cross,” Wright said, questioning how such a process can be condoned by a civilized nation.The concept of “justice” may be “the most tragic lie in all of this,” Wright said. “Vengeance and justice are two different ideas. There’s no justice in this.”“A Case for Life” is available from the Cathedral of St. Philip Bookstore online at cathedralbookstore.org or by phone at 800-643-7150. A panel discussion and book signing will be held at 7 p.m. Feb. 15 at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal Church in Atlanta. Participants will include some of the collection’s authors, as well as Sister Helen Prejean, author of “Dead Man Walking.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] February 12, 2018 at 5:15 pm Our Christian faith as expressed through our Episcopal belief and practice does not conflict in any way with the judicious and thoughtful application of the death penalty. 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