System can help colleges with crisis

first_imgThe Feb. 4 column, “Higher education is headed for a supply and demand crisis,” by Professor Jeffrey Selingo provides insight into high school graduation rates and the effects on colleges’ future enrollment prospects.The challenges faced by colleges are based on students’ academic achievements, parents’ finances, and colleges’ decisions to compete alone or form regional colleges cooperative services board (NYS Education Law Article 10-D) with interdisciplinary curriculum for maximum resource utilization and cost containment.The state Board of Regents adopted Educating the Whole Child Engaging the Whole School guidelines advocating “age-appropriate skill acquisition through character education, social-emotional learning and standards-based instruction”. Parents, guidance counselors, teachers and students need to persuade school boards to support “Whole Child” development through improved regional BOCES plans for interdisciplinary career and technical education curriculum for students.Collaboration between the New York State United University Professions (UUP) and the New York State United Teachers (NYSUT) to apply for and obtain funds from the National Science Foundation’s Directorate of Education and Human Resources and the National Endowment for the Humanities can benefit students, teachers, school districts, colleges and society.Establishment of an interdisciplinary studies process  for grades 10-16 based on guidance counselors’ individualized curriculum plans can ensure appropriate career and technical education programs for students.Teachers of BOCES and cooperating colleges can enhance their talents and extend humanities and science, technology, engineering and mathematics workforce development.Michael McGlynnWatervliet More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

BLOG: Governor Wolf Offers A Choice – Address Pennsylvania’s Fiscal Crisis or Face Severe Consequences (ROUND-UP)

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Budget News,  Round-Up,  The Blog Yesterday during his 2016-2017 budget speech, Governor Tom Wolf laid out the crisis facing Pennsylvania and the critical decision lawmakers in the House and Senate must make this year: fix Pennsylvania’s structural budget deficit and invest in schools or continue down a path of greater devastation and face further, billion dollar cuts to both our schools and essential social services.“There are two paths we can take: we can fix our deficit and invest in education to move Pennsylvania forward or we can continue to embrace the failed status quo and cut $1 billion from education funding, cut hundreds of millions of dollars to essential social services and continue to stifle the commonwealth’s economic growth.” – Governor WolfHere’s what others are saying about the plan Governor Wolf has laid out:“We support Governor Wolf’s commitment to public schools in his proposals for completing the current fiscal year budget with an increase of $377 million, increasing basic education funding further in the upcoming year, and applying the fair funding formula proposed by the bipartisan Basic Education Funding Commission. In fact, we believe the Governor and General Assembly must invest even more than the $200 million proposed by the Governor for next year to move the state further toward the goal of full and fair funding for schools.” [The Campaign for Fair Education Funding, 2/10/16]“If Pennsylvania doesn’t start making the right budget choices, we’ll end up with a $2 billion budget deficit and $1 billion in cuts to public education. That means another generation of kids – not some hypothetical kids, but real kids, our children and our grandchildren – will struggle to learn with larger classes, fewer teachers, shuttered libraries, and no school nurses. Some schools won’t even have enough money to stay open through June. We can and must do better….Anyone who says this isn’t a crisis is just wrong. It is. Gov. Wolf has a solution to fix it. Now, let’s get it done.” [PSEA, 2/9/16]“”With the resolution of a budget for FY 15-16 still in flux, Governor Wolf today delivered an unprecedented budget address for FY 16-17. Governor Wolf, since the launch of his campaign, has committed to being “a different kind of Governor,” and the past year he has proven just that. His simple refusal to negotiate a budget on the backs of our children and workers is a testament to his fortitude, and his commitment to governing for the people he serves.” [Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, 2/9/16]Easton Area Superintendent John Reinhart placed the blame on the Republican-controlled Senate and House. ‘I thought that the voters in Pennsylvania spoke loudly and clearly with [Wolf’s] election over Corbett,’ he said. ‘It is hard to understand how elected leaders in both the Senate and the House can continue to disregard their responsibility to approve a state budget at the risk of our children and the state’s neediest populations.’” [Morning Call, 2/9/16][Governor Wolf] gave a sobering account of Pennsylvania’s future if lawmakers don’t address a deficit that Wolf called ‘a time bomb, ticking away, right now, even as I speak. If it explodes, if the people in this chamber allow it to explode, then Pennsylvania will experience a fiscal catastrophe the likes of which we have never seen,’ he said.” [Tribune-Review, 2/9/16]“Unless next year’s deficit is closed, property taxes for homeowners will skyrocket, Wolf said. More than 23,000 teachers and school employees would be cut, as would special education and pre-kindergarten programs. Services for senior citizens, the mentally ill, child care and domestic violence shelters also would be slashed, he said.” [Reuters, 2/9/16]“Wolf delivered his plan in a speech to a legislature that has repeatedly rejected his attempts to have any completed budget passed. So this one was laced with sharp rebukes to lawmakers, and dire predictions about what looms if the gridlock doesn’t end: tens of thousands of teacher layoffs, overcrowded classrooms, higher property taxes, and devastating cuts in services for the disabled.” [Philadelphia Inquirer, 2/9/16]“Gov. Tom Wolf warned lawmakers on Tuesday that Pennsylvania’s finances are a ticking time bomb amid a record-long budget gridlock, sending them a spending proposal for the coming fiscal year with no full plan in place for the fiscal year that began back in July.” [WTAE, 2/9/16]“Governor Tom Wolf presented his 2016-1017 Budget. He says the Commonwealth is in crisis  and threatening our future. He told state lawmakers the Commonwealth is billions of dollars in the red and the state will experience what he calls a ‘fiscal catastrophe.’ Governor  Wolf says if the general assembly doesn’t act quickly nearly three quarters of state homeowners will see property taxes skyrocket.” [WBRE/WYOU, 2/9/16]“Gov. Wolf made it clear from the beginning that he doesn’t view the issue of one of ideologies but one of simple arithmetic. ‘The problem is not that Republicans in the General Assembly and I don’t see eye-to-eye,’ Wolf asserted. ‘No, this crisis is not about politics at all. This is about math. Pennsylvania now faces a $2 billion budget deficit. That’s not a Democratic fact or a Republican fact. It’s just a fact.’ He then went on to list the various horrors that would be inflicted on the commonwealth’s schools and citizens if no budget is passed.” [PoliticsPA, 1/9/16]“Wolf says lawmakers must pass the now seven month late budget bill he wants. The governor says that will lead to a half billion dollar increase for schools pre-K through twelve while getting the state out of $2 billion in debt.” [WGAL, 2/10/16] By: J.J. Abbott, Deputy Press Secretary You can find updates and behind-the-scenes content on the 2016-2017 budget announcement on our Facebook and Twitter all this week.Read more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img February 10, 2016 BLOG: Governor Wolf Offers A Choice – Address Pennsylvania’s Fiscal Crisis or Face Severe Consequences (ROUND-UP)last_img read more

EGEB Georgia Republicans increase solar unconventional battery storage NY offshore wind contracts

first_imgIn today’s EGEB:Five Georgia regulators, all Republicans, call for more solar — and to shut down coal.A porous, recyclable silicon battery said to offer more energy density, longer life, for half the price of lithium.New York awards offshore wind contracts to Equinor, Orsted.Hawaiian Electric looks to build more than 900 new megawatts of solar generation. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post EGEB: Georgia Republicans increase solar, unconventional battery storage, NY offshore wind contracts appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more