System can help colleges with crisis

first_imgThe Feb. 4 column, “Higher education is headed for a supply and demand crisis,” by Professor Jeffrey Selingo provides insight into high school graduation rates and the effects on colleges’ future enrollment prospects.The challenges faced by colleges are based on students’ academic achievements, parents’ finances, and colleges’ decisions to compete alone or form regional colleges cooperative services board (NYS Education Law Article 10-D) with interdisciplinary curriculum for maximum resource utilization and cost containment.The state Board of Regents adopted Educating the Whole Child Engaging the Whole School guidelines advocating “age-appropriate skill acquisition through character education, social-emotional learning and standards-based instruction”. Parents, guidance counselors, teachers and students need to persuade school boards to support “Whole Child” development through improved regional BOCES plans for interdisciplinary career and technical education curriculum for students.Collaboration between the New York State United University Professions (UUP) and the New York State United Teachers (NYSUT) to apply for and obtain funds from the National Science Foundation’s Directorate of Education and Human Resources and the National Endowment for the Humanities can benefit students, teachers, school districts, colleges and society.Establishment of an interdisciplinary studies process  for grades 10-16 based on guidance counselors’ individualized curriculum plans can ensure appropriate career and technical education programs for students.Teachers of BOCES and cooperating colleges can enhance their talents and extend humanities and science, technology, engineering and mathematics workforce development.Michael McGlynnWatervliet More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Wednesday, Jan. 29

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionMLK Day: We have a long way to goThe Jan. 21 edition of The Daily Gazette illustrated American racism well.Gazette first page: 1) A long article under the headline “Siena poll: Most say racism persists.” 2) A photo of a parade of largely segregated Union College students, celebrating MLK’s legacy. 3) A long article under the headline “Union students rally to MLK’s message,” continued on page 7 with large photo of Union College’s Dr. Gretchel Hathaway, minority dean of diversity and inclusion, lecturing on MLK’s legacy. First page Local Section: Three photos of fully segregated Americans acting “in the spirit of MLK.” Opinion page: Sympathetic letter suggesting NAACP change its name to eliminate the words “Colored People.”All reminders that earlier this month we celebrated the only national holiday we have that is based on a single person. (in itself racist?) If the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. were to return, I suppose he would be shocked to see what we have done to this nation in his name.From his famous speech: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” What did we get: A nation ruled by “affirmative action,” judged by the color of the skin. That’s precisely what MLK wanted eliminated.This nation will never eliminate racism until we eliminate government racism and help each other on the basis of need, not government edict.Clyde MaughanSchenectadySidewalk plan has plenty of problemsWe are writing to express our concerns regarding the Schenectady Sidewalk Initiative Pilot Project that was rolled out on Ardsley Avenue, and is supposed to roll out in April on our street, DeCamp Avenue.Under this project, residents are expected to pay assessed fees to replace the sidewalks.On Ardsley, residents got “sticker shock” when their tax bills indicated that they were to pay nearly twice as much as they were told, now that the work is done.New bills are supposed to be generated to correct the error.When we were unable to obtain information from the city, The Daily Gazette provided information that allowed us to review expected fees for DeCamp residents; like Ardsley, the costs appear that they, too, will be close to twice what was projected by the city.Some streets have been upgraded in recent years, with no assessed fees, yet others have not. As of today, we still have nothing in writing on when the sidewalks will be repaired, what the paving schedule is or what the actual costs will be.It seems to us that this sidewalk project is not viable.Residents should not have to hound the city to get streets paved and get signed petitions to get sidewalks repaired under a special initiative, especially when downtown and many other streets exactly like DeCamp (Wright, Parkwood and Glenwood) are upgraded with no fees required from residents.This is Councilman John Polimeni’s initiative. What is your response?Laurie and David BacheldorSchenectadyLaurie Bacheldor is an officer for the 12309 Neighborhood Association and vice president of Schenectady United Neighborhoods.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.EDITORIAL: No more extensions on vehicle inspectionsEDITORIAL: Take a role in police reformsHIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: No chickens in city without strong regslast_img read more

Hammer it home

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CIS joins institutional property rush with £48m deal

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West Coast view

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Brown’s Stamp Duty revolution

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Prescott gives DIRFT go-ahead

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In new gaffe, White House hopeful Biden says running for ‘Senate’

first_imgBiden, 77, is known for his verbal stumbles. While they may not be disqualifying — last year he mixed up then-prime minister Theresa May with Margaret Thatcher — they are providing ammunition for critics who question his mental acuity.The latest gaffes come as Biden seeks to make a “comeback” after miserable showings in Iowa and New Hampshire and a second-place finish in Nevada, and days before Saturday’s primary, a monumental test for his campaign.Speaking at a Democratic Party Dinner in Charleston, South Carolina, Biden asked the attendees, many of them African Americans who support his bid, for help in making him the nominee.”Where I come from you don’t get far unless you ask,” Biden said. “I’m a Democratic candidate for the United States Senate. Look me over. If you like what you see, help me out.” Joe Biden’s White House bid has been rocked by a series of verbal slip-ups days before South Carolina’s Democratic primary, a make-or-break contest as the former vice president struggles to reverse his campaign’s slide.Eclipsed by a surging Bernie Sanders, Biden suggested to supporters Monday that he was campaigning “for the United States Senate” — where he served for 36 years, until a decade ago.Biden also blundered by saying he had negotiated the 2015 Paris climate accord with China’s Deng Xiaoping, who died in 1997. Topics :center_img Several US media reported that he added “if not, you can vote for the other Biden,” although review of the video does not conclusively show him saying his name. No other Bidens are in the race.There was no mistaking Biden’s error at a second event, when he claimed to have worked on the Paris climate accord with a Chinese leader who died 19 years before the deal was signed.”I’m the guy that came back after meeting with Deng Xiaoping and making the case that I believe China would join if we put pressure on them,” Biden said.The error was quickly pointed out by President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign.”I honestly wish he would’ve retired & not subjected himself to the rigors of this campaign,” added online personality, activist and Sanders surrogate Shaun King.Biden was to take the debate stage Tuesday with six rivals: Sanders, former mayors Michael Bloomberg of New York and Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana, senators Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar, and billionaire activist Tom Steyer.last_img read more

Jakarta deputy governor confirmation hearing to go ahead despite COVID-19

first_imgThe confirmation hearing for the Jakarta deputy governor, set to take place on March 23, will go ahead as planned with some restrictions imposed as precautionary measures against COVID-19, the Jakarta Council said. The council is expected to hold a plenary session on March 23 to choose between Gerindra Party politician Riza Patria and Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) politician Nurmansyah Lubis as a deputy to Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan for the 2020-2022 period. Council speaker Prasetyo Edi Marsudi said attendees of the plenary session would be limited to city councillors, Jakarta agency heads and mayors. The Jakarta Health Agency is expected to help with the standard operating procedure, such as by providing face masks, hand sanitizer and conducting temperature checks. “[Governor] Anies should have a partner in this kind in this kind of situation. He needs input from a partner, namely a deputy governor,” Prasetyo, a Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) politician, told the press at his office on Tuesday. The deputy governor seat has been left vacant since the former deputy governor, Gerindra Party politician Sandiaga Uno, resigned to run as a vice presidential candidate alongside fellow Gerindra politician Prabowo Subianto in the 2019 elections.The PDI-P holds the most seats on the 106-strong council with 25 seats, followed by Gerindra with 19 seats and the PKS with 15 seats.Riza, a former House of Representatives member, has said he was backed by, among others, the Golkar Party’s Jakarta deputy chairman, Agus Gumiwang Kartasasmita, and the PDI-P. Meanwhile, Nurmasyah has said he is backed by, among others, council deputy speaker Abdurrahman Suhaimi.The feasibility of the 23 March plenary session to choose a deputy governor has been questioned as the central government and the Jakarta administration have discouraged large scale meetings to prevent the COVID-19 from further spreading. Speaker Prasetyo said the council would not receive or conduct any visits for the time being as a preventive measure against COVID-19. As of Wednesday morning, Indonesia has reported 172 confirmed cases of COVID-19. (dfr)Topics :last_img read more

Inflation stable in March but COVID-19 risks loom over outlook: Economists

first_imgTopics : Other products that saw a price hike include eggs, onions, sugar and cigarettes. The transportation sector, however, saw a deflation of 0.43 percent in March with consumers limiting or canceling their trips.“The air transportation fare became a dominant deflation contributor at 0.06 percent of March’s inflation number,” Suhariyanto said.According to BPS data, Indonesia’s core inflation stood at 0.29 percent in March, bringing the annual rate to 2.87 percent, while administered prices and volatile food prices saw a deflation of 0.19 percent and 0.15 percent respectively, resulting in annual inflation rates of 0.16 percent and 6.41 percent.Staple food prices were generally under control thanks to the government’s intervention and the looming harvest season, said Permata Bank economist Josua Pardede.The government took action to curb soaring prices of garlic and onion by temporarily removing the import licensing requirement in March. Under the policy, importers no longer needed import permit letters from the Trade Ministry and import recommendations for horticulture products from the Agriculture Ministry. The policy was in effect from March 19 to May 31.Read also: Panic buying hurts consumption growth in the long run, analysts sayJosua said he expected the inflation level to remain low in April despite the usual price hike during Ramadan.“Normally, demand for goods will increase during Ramadan but the holy month won’t heavily affect the inflation rate this year as it coincides with the harvesting season,” he said.He projected this year’s full-year inflation to stay benign at between 2.9 and 3.3 percent, still within Bank Indonesia’s target of 2 to 4 percent as the pandemic was expected to slow domestic consumption and economic growth. At the same time, the government’s social distancing instruction and quarantine measures in several regions would disrupt goods and services distribution in general.“However, the risks might be offset by the government’s policy to maintain supplies, particularly those of staples, and by its stimuli, such as electricity discounts,” he said.Andry said he expected this year’s inflation would reach 3.25 percent.Read also: Calls mount to suppress increase of basic food prices ahead of Ramadan“This relatively higher inflation forecast compared to the 2019 realization of 2.72 percent is caused by a higher risk of volatile inflation, particularly food inflation due to the COVID-19 outbreak, which has limited the food supply,” he said. The stable inflation, he went on to say, would support BI’s accommodative monetary policy in 2020.“Together with the Fed’s dovish stance and agenda to support the domestic economy, we see that BI will hold the policy rate at 4.5 percent until the end of 2020,” Andry said. Indonesia recorded a benign inflation rate in March as the government’s measures to maintain food prices remain in check but the COVID-19 pandemic poses risks to this year’s outlook, economists have said.The consumer price index (CPI) stood at 0.1 percent in March, slightly lower than the 0.11 percent recorded in the same month last year, Statistics Indonesia (BPS) announced on Wednesday. The annual inflation rate was recorded at 2.96 percent, much higher than the 2.48 percent in March last year but lower than the 2.98 percent in February.“March inflation was due to the price hike of commodities in the personal care and food and beverage expenditure groups,” Bank Mandiri chief economist Andry Asmoro wrote in a research note on Wednesday. “The inflation was related to COVID-19 as the outbreak increased demand for hygiene products and online orders of food and beverage due to the social distancing policy.”center_img The announcement of the country’s first two confirmed COVID-19 cases in early March prompted Indonesians to stock up on hygiene products such as soaps, face masks and hand sanitizers, resulting in a depleted supply of products and soaring prices. The number of infections skyrocketed in a matter of days, prompting the government to call on citizens to work, study and pray from home.Read also: Garlic prices push annual inflation to 2.98% in FebruaryBPS data revealed that the personal care group saw a 0.99 percent price hike in March while food and beverage recorded an inflation of 0.36 percent.Meanwhile, gold, a safe haven asset in times of global uncertainty, became a dominant commodity that contributed to the inflation in March, said BPS head Suhariyanto. Bullion sold by state-owned miner PT Aneka Tambang has surged around 20 percent so far this year.last_img read more